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The Arthur Kill Ship Graveyard

Wired has some more on it.

REACHING THE MARSHY spot on southwestern Staten Island where good boats go to die requires a car, sturdy footwear, and a willingness to be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. Though a sliver of the Arthur Kill ship graveyard is visible from the nearest road, the site’s full grandeur only becomes apparent once you sneak beyond the “No Trespassing” and “Beware of Dog” signs and hack through a miasma of seven-foot-tall reeds that stink of brine and guano.

The thicket finally dead-ends at a colossal pile of junk: thousands of splintered beams of lumber mixed in with broken engine parts. Just beyond this debris field lie as many three dozen ghostly ships in various states of decay, abandoned decades ago in this isolated corner of New York City.

The Arthur Kill ship graveyard was never meant to become such a decrepit spectacle. In the years following World War II, the adjacent scrapyard began to purchase scores of outdated vessels, with the intention of harvesting them for anything of value. But the shipbreakers couldn’t keep pace with the influx of boats, especially once people started to use the graveyard as a dumping ground for their old dinghies. Plenty of ships fell into such disrepair that they were no longer worth the effort to strip, especially since many teem with toxic substances. And so they’ve been left to rot in the murky tidal strait that divides Staten Island from New Jersey, where they’ve turned scarlet with rust and now host entire ecosystems of hardy aquatic creatures.

Christmas Eve

Good morning everyone and Merry Christmas if you are into that sort of thing.

Some of you have read that Dad was a) declared free of the infection in his leg last week and b) it came back strong enough to almost kill him this week.  So he was super sick the last couple of days until the antibiotics started to fight their way back.  Well he is still super sick but not as sick as he was earlier this week.

Today was his first day back at work and we went and got him around 3:30.  While the malls may have been chaotic still, the rest of the city was slowing down.  We came home, had some coffee and hot chocolate.  I also went outside and lit a bunch of lanterns with candles and tea lights.  It gave the house a really cool glow.  We then had some Family Pizza delivered by 6:00 p.m.  After we had pizza, Oliver got to hand out the Christmas presents.

In my stocking was the expected chocolates, candies, and toothbrush.  I also got a Magnum M5 razor and blades.  The Gillette Sensor3 had fought the good fight but it was time to move on.  I also found the soundtrack to Guardians of the Galaxy, a Saskatchewan Roughrider travel mug (Green is our colour, losing is our game), and Call of Duty: Ghosts in there.  Also there was a Sandisk 32 GB SD Card for my Pentax K-30.  I have a 16 GB card but this one is faster and will hold a lot of photos from next year when we hike in the mountains. To keep warm this winter, there were also some leather gloves.  Since I suck getting organized, there was a 2016 organizer from Staples in there.   Finally as is tradition, there was a magazine in there.  This year it was an edition of Sportsnet Magazine.  The whole stocking was pretty amazing.

For Christmas, Dad and Mom gave me a 24 inch television to go downstairs and Oliver gave me a Google Chromecast 2.  I had no idea but I can watch Netflix independently of what is being watched upstairs.  Of course I like watching nerdy documentaries with dad but I still love the gift.

Mom & Dad gave me a really great but discrete looking ring while Dad gave me a really nice stainless steel Timex Calgary Flames watch.  Hopefully the watch works better than the Flames have this season.  Mom gave me a Cross Adventura fountain pen and a couple of journals to write in as well.

Here is what The Art of Manliness says about keeping a journal

In studying the lives of great men, I’ve noticed a common trait: they were all consistent journal writers. Now, I’m not saying that their greatness is directly attributable to their journaling. I’m sure Captain Cook would still have been a bad ass even if he hadn’t kept a diary. But I figure, if great men like these thought it was important to keep a journal, maybe I should, too. Heck, if it weren’t for their journals, we probably wouldn’t know much about their great lives and deeds.
Here’s a short list of great men from history who kept journals:

  • Theodore Roosevelt
  • Thomas Jefferson
  • Charles Darwin
  • Benjamin Franklin
  • Lewis and Clark
  • Andrew Carnegie
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • Captain Cook
  • Winston Churchill
  • Sir Edmund Hilary
  • Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton
  • Doogie Howser M.D I could go on, but I think you get the idea. 
  • Why Keep a Journal

    Your children and grandchildren will want to read it. I know it’s hard to believe right now. Your life probably seems quite ordinary and of little interest to anyone else. And every generation believes that life will pretty much continue on like it is now. When your great-grandpa was kicking it in the 1920’s, he thought to himself, “Who would want to read about this new fangled radio or how I get my food out of an icebox? Phhht! That’s boring stuff!” But it’s not boring anymore; to this generation, such a peak at the olden days is fascinating. And so it is with you. When your grandkids are talking to people via hologram, they are going to be absolutely fascinated by your impressions of those ancient things like the alta vista and cell phones. And unfortunately, they’re not going to be curious about it until they get into their 20’s, realize you’re going to die, and start asking you questions. 

    Trust me, while you think that you’ll be able to remember everything just as clearly in the future, you won’t. Remember when you were a kid and you thought your experiences would be easily recalled at age 30? Now what do you remember from those days besides that time a dog bit you in the face?

    As each year passes, the pixels of our memories burn out and the haze sets in. By age 80, you’ll only remember the faintest outlines of the big things that happened to you. But the stuff that’s really interesting is often the little, seemingly mundane details of life. What was a man’s daily routine like in 2009? Of course, the whipper snappers will ask you about the big stuff too: “Where were you when you found out about the attacks on the World Trade Center?” and “What did you think about the election of Barack Obama?” Your journals will give them the answers they’ll be looking for and will bring you closer.
    And who knows? Maybe the whole world might be interested in your musings someday. You may not think so now, but how many famous men knew that they would be famous before they actually burst onto the scene? And how many men were ignored in their lifetime, only to be celebrated after their death?

    To help me think of things to write about, Dad hit me up with some books on architecture and urban planning, something that the people of Saskatoon hate. I may have to leave town after I read these books.  I have a bunch of thoughts to journal and then blog about. 

    Santa made an appearance and gave me a North Face t-shirt and Air Conflicts: Pacific Carriers.

    Hutch gave me a Coleman trekking pole, and Marley gave me a Black Diamond Orbit 60 lumen lantern.  I had one before but someone stole it while on a school trip so it’s nice to get a new one.

    One present that is in progress is that Dad gave Marley a GoPro Fetch.  He put his GoPro on her.  At first she wasn’t crazy about it but got used to it.  Tomorrow you should be able to see what Christmas looked like from the dog’s perspective.

    My Go Bag

    Lifehacker has talked a lot about the need for a go bag.  A bag that you can grab and take with you on a moments notice.  Dad gave Mom one for her anniversary and she loves it and uses it lots.  Over spring break dad put one together for me.  Here it is.

    My Lifehacker inspired Go Bag

    The bag is a MEC shoulder bag.  Inside it I keep a small notebook, two pens, a pair of Sony MDR ZX-100 headphones (they are perfect and fold flat), iPod Nano, a pair of Bushnell Powerview Compact Folding Roof Prism Binoculars, my Fuji AX600 digital camera, a Kindle, multi-tool, and spare cell phone charger are now all ready to go on a moments notice.